The Concept.
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Senior Road Supervisors.

Police cars.

[Outline]

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Introduction.

Who should become a 'Senior'.

Training.

Powers.
Responsibilities.
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Introduction.
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So... why the need to have Road Supervisors and 'Senior' Road Supervisors?  A Road Supervisor would, principally, be a 'gatherer' of Information... a 'Senior' Road Supervisor would need to be a whole lot more than that!  They would be expected to carry out all the same tasks as a Road Supervisor but should be... better trained: and equipped: have a much more 'hands on' approach to problems on the roads: and be of assistance to those in difficulties.  They would have a closer working relationship with local Police... supplying them with 'Real-Time' Information: [via mobile phone] which would enable them to target their resources more carefully. 
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For a modern day comparison... as to what a 'Senior' Road Supervisor would be all about, we could take a look at the world of leisure activities.  Two examples... Lifeguards at the beach... or the Ski Patrol on the ski slopes... both are used in many parts of the world.  Both are experts in what they do: [swimming or skiing] both have medical knowledge relevant to their tasks... both will enforce the rules if they need to... both will come to your aid when required... and for the most part they are unpaid volunteers: [even the paid professionals have usually done a lot of volunteer work.]  A 'Senior' Road Supervisor could be viewed as something similar for a Nation's Highways.
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Who should become a 'Senior Road Supervisor'.
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This would be a fairly select group... but anyone, could in theory, aspire to become a Senior Road Supervisor... if they met all the basic criteria laid out for becoming an ordinary Road Supervisor... but without doubt, this would not be a job for everyone. 
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Training.
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The following is not a comprehensive list of everything a Senior Road Supervisor would have to learn, just an example to illustrate the kind of things that they would need to know about, and the type of questions they might be asked when out on the road.  There are many aspects of an accident or breakdown which many people are unfamiliar with but with this system... Information: Advice: and Assistance: should be much more readily available.  
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As with all 'courses' mentioned they would have to be devised by professionals who worked in those particular areas.
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First aid. 
Training should be more extensive than a standard First aid course, with a particular emphasise on the type of injuries that are often found in road accidents.  Assessing injuries: treating the injuries: deciding whether to remove a crash helmet: or move the injured can all, literally, be a matter of life and death.  This is not the sort of knowledge that most people possess, so the more who do, the better the chances are that effective treatment will arrive in good time.
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Breakdowns.
There are many different scenarios concerning broken down vehicles, and what course of action would need to be taken.  Not always a problem, if the vehicle is stopped at the side of the road and they are waiting for a breakdown service to arrive then there is nothing to be done.  Sometimes, it's just a case of pushing a vehicle down a side street to clear the road, or with a little bit of know how, get it re-started.  But, on occasions it can be a major headache!  Large truck broken down in the middle of a busy intersection in the morning rush hour, can't be re-started or pushed out of the way.  Someone might call the Police, but that would probably be it, nobody is likely to take it upon themselves to stop and direct traffic until the Police arrive, but in the meantime a major hold up could be developing in all directions. 
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Minor accidents. 
Most of the issues concerning breakdowns would also apply to minor accidents.  Usually there is more than one vehicle involved and the drivers could be in a state of high emotion, which makes for a more volatile situation.  Police will not attend every minor scrape, [but at what point does it become an accident they would attend?] so the whole process could remain under the control of a Senior Road Supervisor.
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Damage assessment. 
Is the vehicle driveable? or do you need a Tow truck?  A Senior Road Supervisor should be able to answer these questions for you.  Even if a vehicle can initially be driven there could still be damage which means it would very quickly come grinding to a halt, or something like broken lights might make driving a vehicle illegal.
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Traffic direction. 
This could be trying to merge three lanes of traffic into one, controlling a busy intersection or bringing traffic to a stop while vehicles and debris were cleared away.  Whatever the circumstances, it would need to be done in a way that did not put people at risk of injury.
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Insurance requirements. 
Standard forms could be carried to ensure everyone had the required information, which needed to be exchanged after any accident.  Failure to get all the right information at this stage can prove to be very expensive for some.
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Legal requirements.
What are a driver's legal obligations in the event of an accident?  Should it be reported to the Police? if so, when? where? and by whom?  What if an offence has been committed? or is just suspected?  Should you report damage or just injuries?  What information are you legally required to give to others?  There are many questions like these which need to be thought of and answered at a time when you might not be thinking very clearly.
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Having a bit of help at moments like these could stop drivers inadvertently 'falling foul of the law'.  [At In-Car Gadgets they sell an 'Accident Evidence Kit'... which contains everything you'll need if you're involved in a minor accident.]
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Tow trucks. 
What do you need to ask a Tow truck driver before you engage their services?  How much will it cost? is it a standard fee? or so much a mile?  What are the methods of payment available?  Do you have to go with the vehicle?  Senior Road Supervisors at the scene of an accident should be able to help with all these questions and be able to assist a driver to make alternative travel arrangements.
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Reporting procedures.
There is inevitably a certain amount of 'paperwork' involved in running any system and it must be ensured that all those involved know how to do it correctly. 
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'Real-Time' reporting. 
This is something that ordinary Road Supervisors would not be concerned with.  That is direct contact with a 'control centre' via a mobile phone about things which were happening out on the highways at that exact moment.  This might cover things like... reporting a breakdown: accident: a serious offence taking place: asking for assistance: for a vehicle to be 'intercepted' or possibly even information about traffic congestion.  Good training would be necessary to ensure that the system did not end up suffering from 'Information overload' with 'vital' Information simply getting buried under a mountain of 'unimportant' Information.
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Major accidents.
The scene of a major accident can be total chaos for quite some time.  Even if there are a lot of people at the scene, no one is likely to take charge of the situation until the emergency services arrive.  This is the real test of whether a person would be suitable to become a 'Senior' Road Supervisor or not.  Could you imagine yourself arriving at such a scene... a multiple vehicle accident: numerous injured: bad weather: heavy traffic: two dozen other people already at the scene: get out of your car, slip on your fluorescent jacket with 'Senior Road Supervisor' emblazoned across the back, walk into the midst of all the carnage and start telling everyone else what to do??
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Perhaps... there is also a chemical spillage and you must decide to stop traffic: or direct it around the accident: to clear a way through for emergency services: to assess all the injured: and decide whether to leave them where they are: or risk further injuring them because you think there is an even greater risk from the chemicals or a possible fire.  Your decisions could literally be a matter of life and death!  

Traffic Accident.

Of course, such a situation might never arise... but if it did... would you be up to the job?
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Equipment.
Most equipment should be supplied by the relevant authorities, and Senior Road Supervisors should be thoroughly trained in every aspect of their use and any associated risks.  All mobile phone calls to a special Police hotline should be free.  It should also be made easy to get replacement equipment and make any claims for 'soiled' clothes: and the like.
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Personal identification should be issued that could be shown to drivers if they requested to see it... plus something to wear like an armband, hat or jacket with Senior Road Supervisors written on it.
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Flashing beacon...
or a flag: [as used by unmarked Police cars] so the vehicle could easily be identified as belonging to a Senior Road Supervisor.  The flashing beacon could be placed in such a way as to indicate to other Road Supervisors that they require further assistance... or not... possibly to... direct traffic: push a car off the road: collect insurance details: or sweep up some debris.  Clear identification is also required because the vehicle might be used at the scene of an accident: [for instance, to deliberately block a lane for safety reasons.]  Though not expected to behave like a normal Police car... circumstances might arise where it would be necessary to drive down a hard shoulder to attend a breakdown or accident... a manoeuvre that would probably find an ordinary driver being reported. 
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Fluorescent jacket...
waistcoat and/or hat, another form of identification which could be clearly seen by other drivers in any conditions... similar to that worn by other members of the Emergency services.
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Fire Extinguisher...  
a piece of equipment which is already carried by many private vehicles.
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First Aid Kit...
again, something which is already carried by many private vehicles.  Would probably be a more comprehensive package than most people would carry, and the knowledge to use it!
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Tow rope... 
depending on the type of vehicle being used, but can be very useful when trying to move vehicles a short distance to clear the road.  [Check out Halfords for a really comprehensive stock of car accessories.]
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We use... Halfords... No 1 for all types of car accessories.

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Camera.  
Digital, Polaroid or small disposable camera with a built in flash.  Not very expensive and could save an awful lot of time and energy by making photos available to Insurance companies when trying to decide who was liable for an accident.  [In serious accidents, Police would generally attend the scene and collect this information for themselves.]  They could take photos of the position of the vehicles, close ups of any damage and possibly one of each driver.
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Mobile Phone...
an essential part of the equipment as this is a system that is based around the use of modern communications.  Could be used to supply 'Real-Time' Information to Police about serious and dangerous offenders.  Could summons the Emergency services to attend a major accident, [something any member of the public could also do,] or a minor one if there was any kind of a 'problem'.
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Could also be used to supply up to date Information about traffic congestion?  [Check out The Carphone Warehouse for a great deal on all the latest communications equipment.]
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Dustpan and Broom... 
not the sort of thing many people have in their cars, but in the event of a minor accident it is very common to find broken glass and debris left on the road.  At busy times this could be cleared away quickly so that traffic delays were kept to a minimum.
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Torch...
basic equipment carried by many people, essential when attending an accident at night, both to see what you're doing and to warn oncoming vehicles of a potential hazard.
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Reflective triangle...
in some countries it is compulsory to carry one of these.  In the event of a breakdown or accident at night [or in a blind spot, during the day] the triangle is placed at the side of the road to warn of the hazard ahead.
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Insurance forms...
a standard form should be issued which contained details of all the information that needed to be collected or exchanged at the scene of an accident.  Often drivers are not thinking clearly after an accident and vital Information is overlooked which could prove to be a very costly mistake. 
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Report book...
more paperwork, but a record should be kept of breakdowns or accidents attended, details filed for the benefit of Insurance companies and the Police notified if required.  Possibly, there could be a payment system for those attending accidents, or at least an easy way to make a claim for clothes or equipment which would inevitably be soiled or ruined when performing these tasks.
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Powers.
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Legal authority. 
Senior Road Supervisors could have some kind of legal authority, [more like a Police Officer than an ordinary member of the public,] to assist them in carrying out their responsibilities.  This means... if they attended an accident which already had a number of Road Supervisors at the scene, they would immediately be, 'officially' in charge... their instructions would have to be followed.  If they signalled traffic to stop, it would have to stop... if they instructed a driver to move their vehicle, it would have to be moved... and refusal to do so would be an offence.
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Request Police assistance. 
Any member of the Public who comes across an emergency situation can call for the assistance of the authorities, a Senior Road Supervisor should have extended powers in this area.  At the scene of a breakdown or minor accident [which Police would not normally attend] a driver may act in a way that is... suspicious: aggressive: uncooperative: erratic: etc. etc. which may prompt the Senior Road Supervisor to call for Police to attend. 
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Request an 'Interception'.
If a driver fled the scene of an accident after they had been told to wait, then the Police could be asked to intercept the vehicle.  In the normal course of driving around a Senior Road Supervisor may be witness to some very suspicious behaviour or erratic driving which they though deserved to be brought to the attention of local Police.  This could be because the driver was 'all over the road', and possibly under the influence of drink or drugs... driving in an extremely dangerous fashion... suspect that a car might be stolen: [i.e. youths in an expensive, high performance car which was being abused] that some kind of criminal activity was taking place... like selling drugs: etc. etc. etc.
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Responsibilities. 
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Be a good example.
As with ordinary Road Supervisors... it would be essential that they were a good example to others whenever they were out on the roads, and that means always driving in a way that is Safe, and being Considerate and Courteous towards others.  Anyone that was not might find that they accumulated 10 points on their own licence and their status would be lost.
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Assist whenever required. 
Many people simply do not wish to become involved with other peoples' problems.  It can be a very stressful experience to have, even a relatively minor accident or to breakdown on a busy city street or an isolated road.  Apart from the person who had actually broken down, life would also be made easier for those who wished to get past, if someone had taken charge of the situation.  It may be a much easier option to just drive on by than to become involved but when everyone takes the easy option the whole of society suffers. 
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Becoming a Senior Road Supervisor would... above all things... be a commitment to the welfare of other Road-Users.
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Supply 'High-Quality' Information.
Probably the 'Highest Quality' Information is that which is taken by cameras attached to Police cars as they follow a vehicle and film an offence taking place... irrefutable proof of bad driving.  Information from Road Supervisors would not be to that standard... but would mean supplying Information about other drivers that was... clear: detailed: accurate: unbiased: and easy for others to understand.  Taken together with maybe, dozens of other reports, this could paint a very accurate picture of an individual's driving habits.
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Supply 'Real-Time' Information.
'Real-Time', would mean making a report to the Police by mobile phone about something that was happening at that very moment.  They could be reporting... an accident: a breakdown which was causing a serious hold-up: an erratic or dangerous driver that they would like to have intercepted: suspected criminal activity: or they could even be used to collect details about general traffic conditions.  Police could prioritise the Information and react, as and when their resources allowed.
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Britain 2003: The British Government are considering the concept of having some kind of highway Patrol Officers... who would deal with... minor accidents: breakdowns: and traffic congestion: freeing up the Police to deal with more serious matters.  This would make them very similar to Senior Road Supervisors under this system.  So, this could also be a possibility... to have a number of full-time... professional people carrying out these duties... possibly using motorbikes so they could get to minor incidents quickly... co-ordinating their efforts with other Road Supervisors... and maintaining close contact with the Police Authorities.
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The Bottom Line.
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The basic idea here is to fill the gap between the responsibilities that the general public have for themselves and the service offered by the Police.  This kind of role could be fulfilled in a number of different ways... using a Group: or a combination of Groups with a range of powers and responsibilities.  But essentially it is to deal with minor problems and to give assistance to drivers in distress... rather than just dealing with emergencies or criminal behaviour. 
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