The Concept.
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Licences.

[Outline]

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Introduction.
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In the past... from the moment a driver passed their driving test... they were treated as a fully fledged driver with very few restrictions.  The only people who treated them differently were Insurance companies... who knew very well that young drivers were far more likely to be involved in an accident... and charged them a premium that reflected this fact.  [See blinkx Videos for more Information and News Stories on the issue of young drivers.]
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The 'Graduated' licence... has been introduced in a number of States in the U.S.A. in recent years with a considerable degree of success.  There is nothing, we fundamentally disagree with in this system... we believe it is a very significant improvement in dealing with young and inexperienced drivers... and the system that we are advocating continues even further down this road.  There should be a very distinctive, second phase of learning... when a driver has the opportunity to earn a Full licence... a period where the driver is, in effect, on 'Probation'.  During this period young drivers are statistically, 'high-risk'... and should therefore be carefully monitored... if things were not 'going to plan', the sooner this fact was established and dealt with the better.
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Article.   Driver education: how to get the results we are looking for Scholarly article recommends changes to DE at all levels, aiming at a new and more effective role for DE in the new century.  [More Articles]
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Graduated Licence: [our system]
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Learner: Probationary: Full: Advanced.  After passing a driving test we believe drivers should enter a very distinctive second stage of 'learning'.  Though many young drivers might not think so, there is still a great deal for them to learn.  By the time a young driver has passed their driving test they might be feeling very confident and developed quite good skills in handling a vehicle: [this is the most basic aspect of driving and the easiest to learn] but their 'hazard perception' skills are generally quite poor... and these will only improve with experience.  Combine these two factors with another aspect of driving which is to often disregarded... 'Compliance' to the rules of the road... and already you have the recipe for a potential disaster.  
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Ultimately... good driving is all about 'Interaction'... a driver's ability to 'Interact' with their fellow road users in a way which is consistently... 'Safe: Considerate: and Courteous'... and this is the aspect of driving that Road Supervisors would particularly be looking for.
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Our System... incorporates many aspects of other 'Graduated' licence schemes... but, less initial restrictions... closer monitoring of drivers... making Information more widely available to those in 'positions of influence'... more alternative restrictions: [depending on the nature of the problems] and gives a number of important points 'Targets' to aim for.
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Initial Restrictions.
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Compulsory display of a 'P' plate...
[or its equivalent.]  Voluntary schemes have been remarkably unsuccessful... with very few young drivers displaying a 'P' plate.  Young, and newly qualified drivers are particularly 'high-risk' in the first two years after passing their driving tests... and it is essential that these drivers can be easily identified.  It is not uncommon for the least experienced drivers on the roads to also be some of the fastest... and that can be a deadly combination.  
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While younger drivers might be expected to spend at least two years on a 'P' plate this rule might be relaxed for slightly older drivers... for instance, if a driver had spent one year on a 'P' plate and had reached their 22nd birthday? that might be considered long enough.
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Lower blood alcohol levels.  
Blood alcohol levels do impair a driver's judgement: [even though some people believe they actually drive better after a few drinks] and again, young drivers are particularly prone to using excessive drink and/or drugs.  Young drivers have very little experience to rely on so it is even more important for them to keep a clear head.  It is already the law in some countries that both Probationary and Professional drivers: [i.e. Taxis: Buses: Trucks: etc.] must have lower levels of alcohol in the blood.
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Passengers limited to three. 
We do not believe that young and inexperienced drivers who have only just passed their tests should be able to drive something like a mini-bus with eight passengers.  During the Probationary period we think they should be limited to three passengers: [some 'Graduated' licence systems do not allow any passengers to begin with] and this could be reduced if a driver started to accumulate too many points on their licence.
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In many Families... which have just one parent or where both parents work full time, a new driver in the family is seen as an asset, to take themselves... to school: pick up siblings: etc. but parents are also naturally concerned that their children are behaving responsibly and not putting themselves or others at risk.  At present there is little way of knowing what is happening out on the roads... but this system could provide parents with some important feedback to give warnings of any problems which were developing. 
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No 'High-Performance' Cars... 
or Motorbikes.  We do not intend to draw a line here to say exactly what constitutes a 'High-performance' vehicle.  Every model of car is classified by Insurance companies so it would not be difficult to 'draw a line' and say... 'Probationary drivers may use Group 4 or below', [countries may use different systems.]  Insurance companies know the risks involved which is why the insurance costs alone may prevent many young drivers from using fast cars.  
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However... there are a few scenarios that will see young drivers behind the wheel of fast, powerful cars.  They can always buy powerful cars that are old and cheap... and not bother taking out insurance cover... even if it is a legal requirement.  They may be in a position to borrow a high-performance car from their parents: [just because they drive it sensibly when they are out with their parents does not mean they will when out with their friends] or they may simply be wealthy in their own right and so can afford all the costs involved.  Just as it is dangerous for them to use very fast cars it is even more so for them to use powerful motorbikes.
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Less points available...
on their licence: [50 points under a 100 point system.]  This is already the law in some countries.  While it is important that everyone obeys the law it is especially so in the first two years of driving.  With very little experience to draw on new drivers are slow to detect hazards: [let alone the potential of certain circumstances to develop into hazardous situations] so any mistakes are far more likely to be 'punished'.
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Close Monitoring.
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Probationary drivers should be...
easy to spot with a Compulsory 'P' plate.  Keeping a close eye on Probationary drivers means that if they were reported they should get some 'feedback' about their driving and it would supply an early warning to their family about any problems which were developing.  [25 reports should be viewed as 25 opportunities to take action... to change and improve, voluntarily... before a Review Panel started to become involved.]
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Article.   Personal risk: risk behaviour and young drivers If people are predisposed to taking risks, how can they be convinced to drive more cautiously? A psychologist tackles the problem of behaviour change.  [More Articles]
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Police more likely to stop...
and check on Probationary drivers.  Police could keep a particular lookout for Probationary drivers and might be more likely to stop and check them for drink or drugs... particularly if their driving appeared to be a bit erratic.  Police should be able to access Information about how many points a driver had on their licence and any restrictions which had been imposed: [just knowing the points total should be a very good indication as to the likely restrictions.]
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Road Supervisors would be...
more likely to report Probationary drivers if their driving was dangerous or aggressive.  One of the biggest problems on the roads stems from young male drivers who are often prone to taking risks just for the thrill of it.  They will drive excessively fast and often be very aggressive with it.  This group are probably more likely to be reported than any other... but the remedy would be in their own hands... just read the Reports and the Inserts... they would explain exactly what action a driver needed to take... slow up? back off? stop driving through red lights?... or whatever!!
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Review Panels would spend time...
and effort trying to improve the driving of the young, inexperienced, and any high-risk drivers.  In the event that a young driver was not able to iron out their own problems they would inevitably end up under the control of a Review Panel.  The Panel's task would be to spend the required time and effort to sort out the problems which had been identified and try to ensure that the driver did not accumulate even more points and end up losing their licence.
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Information Available to...
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Having spent time and effort gathering Information about drivers, it would then need to be put to some good use.  This Information should not be treated like a 'State Secret'... but anyone who wanted to know how many points a person had on their licence would have to know their driver's licence number first.  Anyone wishing to obtaining more details than this would require the driver's co-operation... apart from the Police: Courts: and Review Panels.  Some people might find that they were in a position to influence the way a young person was driving...
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Families.  
May be able to exert a great deal of pressure on a young driver... particularly if they are relying on parents to supply the vehicle.  At present there is no way of knowing how a young driver is behaving once they disappear down the end of the road... unless they are reported by the Police for an offence.  However much training they have been given... and however sensibly they drive when out with their parent... it should never be assumed that young drivers behave in the same way when out with a group of their peers.  This system offers no guarantees... but could provide a very important 'warning' to parents which might enable them to take action at an early stage.
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Employers...
might like to take a look at a young driver's File before they let them loose on the road with one of their company vehicles... and thereafter use it as a way of monitoring their progress on an ongoing basis.  With any company registered vehicle... the Employer would be the first person to read any Reports.
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Colleges.  
Educational establishments might be able to perform a similar role to parents... particularly if the young drivers in question were living away from home.  They could make sure that drivers complied with any restrictions which had been imposed: [within certain obvious limitations] and organise meetings or forums to discuss driving problems among students.
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Insurance companies...
try to assess the risks posed by individual drivers as accurately as they can... often this means using demographics to a large extent.  This system could potentially give Insurance companies a lot more Information on which to base their assessments... with the benefits going to safer drivers.
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Review Panels...
could use Information on reports to decide on an appropriate 'plan of action'... so that drivers did not continue to accumulate points and end up losing their licences.  Depending on the nature of their problems, drivers could be given... additional training: or education: and then be closely monitored... to make sure mistakes were not being repeated.  If there was no improvement drivers would be called back again and again... with more and more restrictions being put on them each time.
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Police.  
It is not possible to say exactly how any Information might be used.  Any serious incident could result in a driver being reported by mobile phone and 'Intercepted' almost immediately... or being visited at home by local Police at a later date. 
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Courts. 
If a driver did end up in Court then their File would be there with them.  It is not possible to say exactly what use a Court would make of this Information... that would probably vary from country to country.  It may affect... the sentence passed: the fine imposed: or form the basis of any re-training courses which had to be undertaken.  Prosecutors and Defenders might also be given access to a driver's File at some stage of the proceedings.
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Alternative Restrictions.
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Two important elements in becoming a good driver are 'Practice' and 'Feedback'.  With up to 50 points available each year a driver could expect to receive quite a number of Reports... each one should provide some Feedback from an experienced driver: [and include an 'educational' Insert relevant to each offence mentioned] so if a driver was not making satisfactory progress... it shouldn't take that long before the fact was brought to their attention.  As a drivers' points total increased more and more restrictions could be introduced...
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Article.   The effects of a graduated driver licensing program Summarizes an interim report from Ontario, Canada's Ministry of Transportation on the effects of graduated driver licensing on new driver collision rates.  [More Articles]
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'Targets' to aim for: might include...
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15 points or less in order...
to 'graduate' to a Full licence.  If there was an average of ten points available for each driver then a 'Target' of 15 points would not be unrealistic.  A driver would always be in a position to look at their points total and pick an exact date when they could 'graduate' to their Full licence.  Even if over the 15 point mark, drivers could still pick a date and see what they needed to do... 'avoid being reported for 3 more weeks and then graduate'!... once they got another Report through... it might be a couple more weeks before the points would be low enough... but again, that 'graduation date' would always be there to be aimed for.
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At 25 points: a driver's 'File'...
would be reviewed... they might be called to appear before a Review Panel.  A young driver being report 25 times in a single year is quite a lot... so their 'File' should be looked at to see what the problems were.  It is impossible to cover every scenario and say that if the 'File' said this a driver would be called in... and if it said that then they would not.  It would require experience of the system... and then it would be at the discretion of the Review Panel.  But as a guide... if a lot of points had been accumulated in a short period of time: [less than six months] and many of the offences reported were quite serious... then maybe they would be called before a Panel.  
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If the points... had been accumulated over a longer period... the rate of accumulation was definitely slowing... or the offences were not really for dangerous driving... then perhaps the driver in question would not be called in.  For the more borderline cases... perhaps no real decision would be made and the Panel would just keep the File 'Active' to see how things progressed.  But, in any case... the driver could be informed that their File was being reviewed and this in itself might serve as a warning.
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At 25 points: Insurance premiums... 
could be 'loaded' by 25% [every extra 5 points could see an additional 5% added.]  This would see the 25 point mark as another important 'Target'.  Again, this is purely speculation as we are in no position to say what the Insurance industry would or would not do.  But, it would be in their own interests to reward good drivers and to penalize bad drivers.
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After 25 points: any 'serious'...
Incident could see a driver being asked to appear before a Review Panel.  At any time between the 25 and 35 point mark the decision could be made to ask a driver to appear before a Panel... depending on the nature of any reports which had been received during this period.  Drivers would be informed of this possibility.
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At 35 points: a driver would...
definitely be asked to appear before a Review Panel... this would mean that a driver was now only 15 points away from losing their licence and having to go back to being a Learner.  If they hadn't managed to sort out their own problems by this stage it would be time for some positive action.  The first restrictions might be imposed... reduction in the number of passengers from 3 down to 1.  It is a fact that young drivers are much more likely to take risks and behave in a dangerous manner if they have friends with them: [which they are keen to impress.]  By imposing this restriction these friends now have something very definite at stake: [would this be enough to make them a positive influence rather than a negative one?] a few more points and it would be them that was looking for alternative transport.  Friends are likely to be very unimpressed when they have to start walking!
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Motor vehicle crashes... are the leading cause of death among teenagers right across the Industrialised world.  In a study of North American teenagers, one part of the data broke down as follows... the death rate for 16-year-old drivers was about 2.0 per one million trips with no passengers: 2.76 with one passenger: 3.69 with two passengers: and 5.61 with three or more passengers.  So, if the alarm bells start ringing there are very good reasons why decisive action should be taken at an early stage.
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At 40 points: passengers would...
be reduced from 1 to zero. The same thing applies here... the one passenger left could be a good influence or a bad one... they are more likely to be a good influence if they have something at stake.
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Probationary/Graduated licence... however it may come about, it is not necessarily an ideal situation for a young driver to be restricted in this way: [having no passengers] when they were used to having one or more as a learner.  When a young driver goes out with the family they often take the opportunity to get some practice... and driving with a parent is probably the safest way to gain experience.  So, in an instance where a young driver had reached 40 points a Review Panel might allow them to drive with a named supervisor/s [i.e. parents] just like when they were a learner driver.  To indicate this, the driver could display a set of 'P' plates... and/or a set of 'L' plates... that is, a Probationary driver... driving under supervision.  Police should be able to check the exact details of any restrictions via computer. 
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At 45 points: curfew...
a 12 midnight to 5 a.m. curfew would come into force.  This is the time that young drivers are most likely to behave in a reckless manner... but particularly if they are accompanied by their peers.  Some graduated licence schemes already impose this curfew time. 
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At 50 points a driver would...
have to go back and retake their driving test. This should not mean a time ban... unless this was imposed by a Court... but, if all previous efforts to reduce points had failed then there must be some very definite problems.  Attending and completing certain courses may be imposed.  Driving instructors could have access to a driver's File... or possibly be sent a brief from the Review Panel asking them to concentrate on particular problems.  Driving examiners might also be included in this process.
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Once a driver... had started to appear before a Review Panel a number of different option could be made available... depending on the nature of the problems.  Compulsory attendance of certain courses, aimed at their 'problems'... reappearance and review every time the points total increased by another 5 points: [from 45-50 points a driver might be called back after every new report in an effort to avoid the demotion to a Learner's licence] having to submit their own 'plan of action' for reducing their points total... and knowing that failure to co-operate could mean the suspension or cancellation of their licence.  As their points total was reduced the Review Panel might gradually lift the restrictions.
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Senior Drivers.  
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Statistically... as we get older our risk of being involved in an accident starts to increase.  Even though a driver might have been a 'low-risk' for decades the time may arrive when such things as eye sight and reactions start to deteriorate and the associated risks get higher.  Those who slip into this high-risk category might benefit from displaying an 'S' plate: ['S' for Senior: or its equivalent,] possibly some restrictions introduced... or retraining... with the intention of helping these 'Senior' drivers maintain their independence for as long as possible.  [See blinkx Videos for more Information and News Stories on the issue of elderly drivers.]
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Article.   How old is too old? Recent attention on crashes of older drivers leads columnist Gary Magwood to propose a lifelong evaluation process for all drivers.  [More Articles]
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Learner: Probationary: Full: Advanced.
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The essential aspect of the Graduated licence system is that drivers have to maintain a good standard of driving to advance to a higher group... and will inevitably slip back if their driving deteriorates in some way.  Someone classified as 'Advanced' [Road Supervisors] might be demoted as soon as they accumulated just 10 points.  [The qualifications for being considered 'Advanced' could involve any number of factors??]  Then a driver with a Full licence might be demoted to a Probationary licence for a year: [or more] if they accumulated 75-100: with all the associated restrictions... rather than be banned from driving completely.  Then they only regain their Full licence when there has been a significant improvement.
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Road Supervisors

Senior Road Supervisors  

New Points System

Licences.  

Files. 

Social Pressure

Review Panels

Offences.

Information: Data.