The Concept.

Files.

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Review Panels.
[Outline.]
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Introduction.
Review Panels.
Branch meetings.
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Introduction.
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In some countries... drivers with bad records are made to... undergo retraining: retake their driving test: or attend courses... which is an attempt to actually improve the driving or behaviour of the individuals concerned.  In other countries attempts at raising driving standards are limited... mainly to... on-the-spot Fines: Fines sent through the post: Fines handed out in Court: a deduction of points from a licence: driving bans: community orders: or imprisonment.
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All are 'Punishments' of one kind or another... handed out in the hope that 'they won't do it again'... and to act as a warning to others: [to a certain extent it does work... and we are certainly not advocating the wholesale removal of the 'Punishment' system... especially for serious offenders.]  But, in order to raise driving standards... and significantly reduce the number of accidents on the roads... something a bit more sophisticated than this sledgehammer approach is required.
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In those cases... where 'Motivation: Deterrents: Education: and Social Pressure' had not produced results... something a bit more pro-active might be required to overcome an individual's 'resistance to change'.  That would mean getting experienced drivers to sit down with these problem drivers... studying their 'File' until they had a very good understanding of the nature of their 'problems'... spending the necessary time and effort to ensure that they did change their behaviour... and then closely monitoring their progress to ensure they did not slip back into their old ways.
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Road Supervisors' Review Panels.

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Review Panels...
Volunteers... a three person Panel... one Police officer: [who might attend as part of their official duties] and two Road Supervisors: [unpaid volunteers] who would 'Review' Files... prior to any appointments... dealing with those drivers who either could not or would not change their behaviour voluntarily.  [This joint responsibility would give Police the opportunity to develop a good working relationship with members of the Public.]  The Panel should have a very good idea what the problems of the individual cases were... what possible courses of action they might take... and any questions they might wish to ask... before the driver was called in.  The final course of action might then depend on... the 'attitude' of the driver: the answers they gave to questions: their understanding of the problems: and what they believed the solution should be. 
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A 'Senior' Review Panel...
should also consist of three members... but more 'qualified' to deal with 'major' decisions and 'Appeals'... which might be done very quickly.  This 'Senior Panel' would more likely consist of those with a legal background: [who would have a good knowledge of the guidelines and any legal aspects of the system] members of the law enforcement community: [who had experience in dealing with difficult individuals] and Senior Road Supervisors: [who would know all about 'problem' drivers... the various courses... and re-training programmes available.]
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Probationary drivers: reaching...
25 points [and Full licence holders, reaching 50 points,] would have their Files activated.  The File would be 'Reviewed'... and the Panel would decide if the driver should be called in to discuss their situation.  In any case, a letter should be sent to let the driver know that their File was now under 'Review'.  These are quite high points totals and depending on how the points were accumulated, it might be time to try and address some of the problems.  One Road Supervisor could review the File and then discuss with others what action they thought should be taken and why. 
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There are so many different ways that points could be accumulated that it is not possible to say exactly when a driver would be called in and when they would not.  Some general guidelines could be issued... over what period were the points accumulated? is the overall trend slowing? how serious do the offences appear? etc. etc. once a driver had gone over the 25 or 50 point mark... they could be called to appear before a Review Panel at any time.  [See blinkx Videos for more Information and News Stories on the issue of young drivers.]
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Probationary drivers: reaching...
35 points [and Full licence holders, reaching 75 points] would definitely have to appear before a Review Panel to account for the points they had accumulated... and outline what steps they were taking to ensure that their points total would not continue to increase.  This would normally be the highest totals that drivers could reach without making an appearance in front of a Review Panel.  This could happen quite suddenly... if a driver already had a fairly high points total and then had to appear in Court on a fairly serious matter... they might suddenly come to the attention of a Panel... having already accumulated 76-99 points: [or 36-49 points, for probationary drivers.]
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Courts might order... a driving ban... or demotion to a lower licence... before reaching the 50 or 100 point limits.
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Review Panels would...
have the power to demote Probationary drivers [reaching 35 points, or over] to a Learner's licence... if the 'wrong' attitude was shown: [subject to confirmation by a 'Senior' Review Panel.] This could be viewed as a 'failure' because it would mean that the Panel were not getting through to the driver.  [They would be given fair warning... so, any driver would also have to be pretty stupid to allow this situation to develop.]
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It could result... from a driver's failure to respond to any initiatives: i.e. not... turning up to meetings: training courses: answering mail: etc. or, turning up, but being... uncooperative: belligerent: disruptive in classes... and the like.
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Review Panels would...
have the power to demote a Full licence holder [reaching 75 points, or over] to a Probationary licence... if the 'wrong' attitude was shown: [subject to confirmation by a Senior Review Panel] same as the category above.  It is essential that a Review Panel should have 'Teeth'... and not be something that drivers felt they could just ignore and expect to get away with.  While the Panel should try and assist a driver as much as possible... the final responsibility would always be on the drivers themselves to make the necessary changes. 
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Any driver... who had been 'demoted' should be considered 'high-risk'... and carefully monitored by the Review Panel as their problems may continue.
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Every time a driver's points...
increased by another 5 points they would be recalled back before the Panel... to 'Review' their situation... establish why things were continuing to go 'wrong'... and decide on another 'plan of action'.  [This could be a straight forward increase: i.e. going from 75 to 80 points... or could be an up and down trend: i.e. a reduction from 80 points to 75 points and then an increase back up to 80 points.]  Either way... it would mean that the trend was not downwards... and so their 'plan of action' was not working.
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The Files of these Drivers...
would be carefully monitored at this time and a Panel could decide to recall a driver at any time... if they received a 'report' that they considered was serious.  Generally, a driver would only be recalled if they had a 5 point increase... but a report might appear quite serious and the 'Case Officer' [for want of a better name] might decide that they really need to have a talk about this latest development.  When a driver reach their last 5 points a Panel might call them in after every report in an effort to avoid a demotion.
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This shouldn't come as a surprise to the driver... who would be warned that this was a possibility.
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Any Driver could ask...
for an appointment to discuss a number of reports [5+] which they felt were a 'mistake'... or they had a valid explanation for.  It would not be necessary to discuss every single report which may be disputed... or if the points total were fairly low... say less than 10 points.  But, a driver could lose their Road Supervisor status at 10 points... and may wish to dispute some reports.  Or, for example... a driver might have used a hard shoulder to by-pass a lot of traffic which had come to a standstill, [which is illegal... and perhaps they had accumulated 20 points for this one incident] but, they had an emergency situation... they had to ferry a seriously ill person to hospital... and had documented proof of this fact.  A Panel might decide that this was an understandable course of action in the circumstances... and the driver have these points removed from their licence, [although the incident and decision should remain on record.]
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The possible scenarios are infinite, but the point is... that Review Panels should be flexible and able to use their common sense.
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Review Panels would have...
the power to reduce points: [up to 10] if they thought there was clearly an error... or if the driver had a valid excuse.  This system should try to be flexible but would still need to ensure that it was not open to abuse.  Any reduction in points should be agreed by all three members of a Panel... or the decision should go on to a Senior Panel.  Any reduction of more than 10 points... could be recommended by a Review Panel... but should be confirmed by a Senior Panel. 
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No one should sit on a Panel if the driver under review was 'known' to them in any way... shape... or form.
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'Major' decisions would be...
put to a 'Senior Panel' for them to confirm... or reject any recommendations.  This might mean listening to an explanation of why points should be deleted... if both parties were in agreement.  It might be done when a driver was not present... if the problem was that the person failed to keep appointments with no explanation.  If there was no agreement on a 'plan of action'... the 'Driver' and the 'Case Officer' could both have the opportunity to 'present their case'... to the Senior Panel before a final decision was made.
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'Major' decisions would mean...

where a driver was being 'demoted' before reaching the 50 or 100 points total: [at which point, demotion to a lower class of licence would be automatic.]  Reducing a driver's points total... whereby they avoided demotion to a lower class of licence... or reducing the number of points by more than 10.  Panels would need to be objective in their decisions... but there is always the potential for personality conflicts... and some drivers may feel like they were being victimised.  If a Major decision was made then at least six people would have been involved in making that decision... the Senior Panel would make sure that decisions were made within guidelines and without prejudice... fear... or favour. 
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If there was a personality clash a driver should be able to ask for a different 'Case Officer' to be assigned to them... at least once? twice??
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Review Panels could have...
a whole range of options available to them, including... restrictions: retraining: courses: demotions: suspensions: and cancellations.  Exactly what course of action they decided to take would depend on a number of factors... but generally no decision would be made until after a lengthy interview with the individual in question: [unless they failed to turn up for appointments.]  The final 'plan of action' would then depend on... the 'attitude' of the driver: the answers they gave to questions: their understanding of the problems: and what they believed the solution should be. 
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Attitude.  
Any driver would need to have some willingness to address their own deficiencies.  It is quite possible that they would not have this attitude, if they had been... reported many times: sent educational inserts: written warnings: and still allowed their points total to rise and rise without addressing the problem of their own free will.  Or, there might not be any attitude problem... perhaps the driver would just have very poor driving skills: or they received the majority of their points as the result of a single appearance in Court.  Whatever... the time would finally arrive when something had to change... so, how would they respond?  They might say the right things in front of a Panel... but would they actually change in practice? a close monitoring of subsequent reports may give the answer.  In the event a driver had a real 'attitude problem'... a Panel might decide to get tough with them at a very early stage.
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Questions.  
If their attitude was not obvious then asking them some probing questions about the individual reports in their File might be more revealing.  A question about... jumping a red traffic light: or dangerous overtaking: could tell you about their attitude to risk taking.  Questions about things which are inconsiderate or discourteous could tell you about their attitude towards their fellow road users and society in general.  Ultimately, as they were being asked about the individual reports they would be put in the position of having to 'defend the indefensible'.  
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How good an answer could a person give about... why they jumped a red traffic light? why they were tailgating someone? or why they were threatening to assault another driver?
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Understanding.  
On reading the reports sent to them a driver might understand perfectly well why they had been reported... in which case the obvious question would be... 'What steps had they taken to try and rectify the problem'?  If they seemed oblivious to the problem: i.e. believing they were very good drivers, with 'great reactions'! and the problem was everyone else... then a Panel might decide this driver would benefit from a training course of some kind.
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Solutions.  
The best solution would be for a driver to... 'realise' the problems they were causing: the risks they were posing to others: the possible consequences of their actions: and decide that they did want to change.  They could be asked... 'What they thought they needed to do to sort out their problems'? let them come up with a plan.  The Panel might continue with more probing questions... 'So why haven't you done this already'? making them think even more about the problems... until they were fully satisfied that the person had a clear understanding of all the issues... and they were serious about their new found commitment to change.
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A 'Plan of Action'. 
Having reached a point where a Panel had a good understanding of the driver and their problems... they could then try and reach an agreement with them about tackling the problems.  The driver may come up with their own 'plan of action'... or, failing that, might agree with a plan put to them by the Panel... in which case there could still be a good point to proceed from.  Perhaps there would be an unwilling agreement that the Panel were sceptical about... but gave it a try, just to see how it went.  Maybe they would not be able to reach any agreement. 
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The following covers some possible solutions...
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Restrictions.  
Some possible restrictions are outlined under the section called... 'Licences'... particularly for Probationary drivers.  These restriction might include... not being permitted to use 'high-performance' cars or motorbikes: limiting the number of passengers which could be carried: and having a curfew between certain hours of the night: i.e. 12 midnight to 5 a.m.
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Informal Agreements.  There might also be informally agreed restrictions... for instance, an elderly driver with an 'S' plate may have been reported many times for being... to slow: not signalling: and the like.  As part of their 'plan of action' to keep their points total down [but still maintain their independence] they might make an informal agreement with a Review Panel that they would only use their vehicle for local trips... they would stay off the roads during the rush hour... and for any long journeys they would take some other form of transport.  The Review Panel would... monitor the situation: read any reports sent in: and if the agreement did not seem to be sticking... perhaps another meeting or 'home visit' might be agreed... to discuss the problem further.
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Retraining.  
Some drivers may have problems simply because they have poor driving skills.  Maybe... they were never taught properly in the first place: or they have developed bad habits over the years: or their skills had deteriorated as they became older.  [With young drivers the problems are often about choosing an 'appropriate speed' and 'hazard perception', which are very difficult to teach... this only really comes with experience.]  Possibly there are just a few aspects of their driving that needs improving... but by reading the reports and talking to the driver it should become clear exactly how much extra training was required.
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Possibly... some Road Supervisors could go out on the road with a driver to gain some first hand experience... get them to give some 'commentary' driving... where the driver explains out loud what they are doing and why they are doing it.  They might then give them some feedback... a few tips... some driving lessons on a volunteer basis... and in the right circumstances a Road Supervisor might even take on the role of a 'mentor' or a 'role model' to a young driver??
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Courses.  
Some countries already run official 'driver improvement courses', [which they might only be sent on after having an accident or being convicted of a serious offence,] but the Instructors may still have very little insight into the true behaviour of the driver before the course started... and no effective way of monitoring their progress once the course is finished.
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These courses could be relevant to... drink or drug problems: driving skills: anger management: etc. etc. and could easily be incorporated into this system... with the Review Panel deciding which course/s should be attended on the basis of the information in the file... and an interview with the driver.  Any course Instructor would have a copy of the file... and so could address the problems of each individual within the context of the course.  Finally, the Panel would carefully monitoring their progress to make sure they did not slip back into their old habits once the course was completed.
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As we keep saving... this system is all about Information.  To rectify the problem... you need Information about the driver before they attended a course... you need to make sure they are on an appropriate course for their problems... and then you need to monitor them after the course has been completed... otherwise you have no way of gauging how effective your programme is working.
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Demotions.  
The next two categories are forms of punishment... they are what would give a Review Panel 'Teeth'.  [Though nothing like the powers of a Court... who can impose fines: driving bans: and imprisonment.]  Failure to... co-operate: complete tasks which had been agreed on: or turn up for appointments could lead to a person being demoted to a lower class of licence... or having it suspended.  A demotion would probably result from... a string of serious offences plus an obvious reluctance to make any changes: [i.e. bad attitude] no copies of their reports: no 'plan of action': not accepting that any changes needed to be made: open hostility to the Panel: etc. etc. etc.  
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Those demoted might start out on a Probationary licence with no points... but they would clearly be 'high-risk' individuals and close monitoring of their immediate future progress would probably be a good idea.
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Suspensions.  
This would probably be used when a driver continually failed to... keep appointments: answer letters: or attend courses.  They could be notified by letter... 'Failure to attend an interview within 14 days?? and the licence will be suspended'.  Once the driver had attended the required meeting or course the suspension [or threat] could easily be lifted.
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Cancellations.  
To the recipient this would probably feel like it was a punishment... although it might just be a practical necessity.  Cancellation... would mean that the licence was being taken away and would not be returned.  In many cases this would be because of deteriorating health and/or old age.  Eye sight and reactions do deteriorate as we become older... and statistically our chances of being involved in an accident increases.  Review Panels could do everything possible to help older drivers maintain their independence as long as possible... but the day would inevitably come, [for many of us] when it would be time to give up the licence.  
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There is often a process in place... for the annual or bi-annual medical examinations of older drivers... and with this system it might be that a driver's File was also examined at this time... though their points total might be quite low, [perhaps they did not drive very often] it is possible that the 'warning signs' might already be there.
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It can be a fairly traumatic experience... having a driving licence taken away after fifty or sixty years... so, generally... it would probably be better if older drivers were dealt with by drivers who were closer to their own age group... the news might come to them a little easier than from someone who was substantially younger.  This type of situations might better be dealt with in the context of a home visit and an empathetic ear... rather than any demands to attend meetings.  [See blinkx Videos for more Information and News Stories on the issue of elderly drivers.]
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Inspections. 
Those drivers who have an obvious disregard for the rules of the road often have a disregard for other rules as well.  Review Panels might ask a driver to bring their vehicle and all its documentation with them.  There are many drivers around using... stolen vehicles: unroadworthy vehicles: have no insurance: have not paid the necessary taxes or registration fees: have outstanding fines: have not registered the vehicle at the correct address: etc. etc.  Knowing this was another possibility... these drivers might... get their documents in order: or drive safely so as to avoid Review Panels: either way, an improvement on the present situation. 
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A driver would not have...
to agree with any course of action being recommended by the Review Panel... the driver could 'appeal' to the 'Senior Panel'... but their decision would be binding.  A driver should not expect to receive any easy treatment from a Senior Panel... the message from them would be clear... that the individuals behaviour is unacceptable... and one way or another... it is going to be brought to an end! changes and improvements must be made... so, "how are they proposing that they achieve this"?
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Volunteers would not have... 
to deal with 'difficult' drivers: i.e. those with criminal records... or those who were... aggressive: intimidating: or just plain unresponsive.  If anyone showed the 'wrong' attitude... they could expect to have their licence suspended... or cancelled.  These could be dealt with by the Police officer sitting on the Panel... who would have experience in dealing with these type of people.
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A central Committee should...
analyse Data to check for any anomalies which might arise in the system... and would therefore, need to be treated in a different way.  In advance it is not possible to say exactly what these anomalies might be... but maybe such things as... unmarked Police cars being reported for pushing through traffic or parking in awkward places.  Maybe... it turns out that people who are famous tend to get reported a lot... or [human nature being what it is] those driving very expensive cars.  Those who were very famous... had personalised number plates... and drove a 'flash' car... might find they got reported, literally, hundreds of times.  This being the case... then the reports would obviously be for reasons other than driving behaviour: [maybe a special Panel would deal with these cases] the system needs to be flexible enough that it does not claim any 'victims' of its own. 
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Review Panels and...
'Senior' Review Panels... could all sit at the same time in the same location: [possibly a local school or college] so that all recommendations and appeals could be dealt with immediately... rather than having a long drawn out legal process.  There may be a number of Review Panels... all sitting at the same time... but just one 'Senior' Review Panel.
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Road Supervisors' Branch Meetings.
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Introduction.  
Many Road Supervisors would probably limit their activities to reporting the odd driver that had annoyed them... and that would be it.  As a grassroots organisation which aims to empower individuals and communities there would always be things to be done at a local level.  Local people coming together to solve local problems... rather than sitting around waiting for a Government Department to deal with it.  Apart from the Review Panels... there are many things which could be done... how successful it was would depend on how much time and effort was put into it.
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Here are a few things which would need looking at...
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Administration.  
A 'Branch' of any organisation will inevitably mean there is... paperwork to be done: meetings to be arranged: funds to be raised: people to be notified: etc. etc. and it won't happen on its own.  It would need quite a lot of people [including the usual committee... Chairperson: Secretary: Treasurer: etc.] to run the administration concerning Branch Meetings... and Review Panels.
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Develop a positive working...
relationship with local Police.  Not only would Police sit on Review Panels but they could also attend Branch Meetings.  This would give local people direct access to those responsible for patrolling their streets... they could air their problems... and the Police could also explain things from their point of view.  Working closely with people to solve problems is a very good way of developing a positive relationship.
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Identify and discuss problems... 
in the area.  No one knows better than the local people what the problems are in a particular area.  These could be... parking problems: speeding drivers: hold ups due to poor junction layout: contributing factors at 'accident blackspots': rubbish being illegally dumped: drug dealers: etc. etc. etc.  Possibly this could act as a Forum to discuss these problems... and someone from... the Dept. of Transport: Highways: local Council?? [or equivalent] could be asked to attend if people wanted to discuss physical changes to a road as a possible solution: i.e. pedestrian crossing: speed humps: roundabouts: traffic lights: etc. etc.
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Those from the 'Dept. of Transport' [or the equivalent] might also be able to analysing data and identify 'reporting blackspots': i.e. many drivers were being reported around a particular intersection or stretch of road.  They could notify the Branch that they would like to discuss the issue... and get some feedback or anecdotal evidence to go with their statistical evidence before deciding on a course of action.
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Co-ordinate any 'Initiatives'...
between Road Supervisors and the Police.  This could mean providing some practical support... like supplying a 'radar' gun to measure speed: or just making Police aware of something which was being 'targeted'... like drivers using an 'inappropriate speed' past a school.
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Possibly a monthly... or quarterly 'Newsletter' could be produced so as to... inform local people about any offences being targeted in their area: to publicize any successes: to give Police an opportunity to put their point of view about certain issues: to set the agenda for meetings... We intend to discuss 'this'... Police want to discuss 'that'... Dept. of Transport would like to discuss 'the other'... this Time: this Place: all welcome!!' etc. etc. etc.
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Recruit drivers to become...
Road Supervisors.  This might become at least one point where drivers could be invited along: [perhaps through a Newsletter] and recruited as Road Supervisors.  There would not need to be an upper limit on the number of people becoming Road Supervisors so any recruitment could be an ongoing process... the more the better.
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Recruit Road Supervisors to...
sit on Review Panels.  This would require a lot more commitment than just being an ordinary Road Supervisor.  They would need to attend a course so they knew all the possible options for... courses: retraining: legalities: common driving problems: etc. and strategies for dealing with them.  Once training was completed... they would need to study 'Files' assigned to them... and attend meetings on a fairly regular basis.
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Recruit Road Supervisors to...
train as 'Senior' Road Supervisors.  Although Senior Road Supervisors would need to be recruited through some channels... Branch Meetings would probably be limited to handing out literature about it.  This would involve quite extensive training which would probably only be given after successfully completing an interview and an exam of some kind.  The nature of the course... who was recruited... who ran the system: etc. would inevitably vary from country to country. 
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Back to the Top Home Site Plan Outline>>

Road Supervisors

Senior Road Supervisors  

New Points System

Licences.  

Files. 

Social Pressure

Review Panels

Offences.

Information: Data.