The Concept.
I
Social Pressure.

[Outline.]

I

Introduction.

Family.

Road Supervisors.

Schools, Colleges, Universities.

Senior Road Supervisors.

Employers.

Probationary Licence.

Potential Employers.

'P' Plates.

Insurance Companies.

Points.

Review Panels. 

Reports.

Police.

Police: Educational 'Inserts'.

Financial Penalties.

Driver's File.

Courts.

Active Files.

Prison.

I
Introduction.
I
'Social Pressure' can be used in many different ways in order to influence the behaviour of individuals.  For the purpose of this exercise... we are going to break it down into five separate categories: [even though they remain 'Interlinked' in many ways,] they are... Motivation: Deterrents: Education: Social Pressure: Enforcement: and Punishment. 
I
If 'Social Pressure' is exerted successfully... in subtle ways... then individuals do not feel 'repressed'... but will behave in a particular way without even thinking about it... it simply becomes a part of the culture of their society... like queuing up at a bus stop: [or not, as the case may be,] or driving in a particular style: [which varies a great deal from country to country even though the rules of the road may be very similar.]
I
A rather less subtle approach... the controversial, but effective Advertisement which has been showing in NSW Australia since June 2007.  The ego-busting "Little Pinky" campaign is aimed at "boy-racers" types... [a demographic which can clearly be identified as 'high-risk.]  The implication is, that those who "speed to impress", do so because they are "appendagely challenged".  Click Here to see the video clip. Australian, anti-speeding, "little pinky" campaign.
I
I
Motivation.
Some people are very Self-Motivated and will strive for improvement... like taking an Advanced Driver's Course.  More could be encouraged to improve... particularly if they had a definite reason for doing so... like becoming a Road Supervisor.
I
I
Deterrents.
While others could, at least, be Deterred from acting badly... knowing there were so many Road Supervisors about.  Drivers would also be deterred from the worst excesses knowing that Senior Road Supervisors could report them to the Police directly using Mobile Phones.  Anyone who was identified as a serious offender: [like a convicted drink-driver] or a vehicle which had been identified as registered at a false address: etc. could be targeted and intercepted by the Police as a priority.  [This Information could also be used at a later date when a vehicle passed a Police car fitted with a new number plate recognition computer system.]
I
I
Education.
Some people respond to Education... they could have a problem with their driving that they were totally unaware of.  If it was explained to them... what they were doing wrong... why it was wrong... and what they should be doing... they may change their behaviour voluntarily.
I
I
Social Pressure.
For those who did not change their behaviour voluntarily a little more Pressure could be brought to bare.  The next strategy would be to make Information available to those who might be able to persuade a driver to change their behaviour because they were in a 'Position of Influence'... like Family: Employers: and Insurance Companies.
I
I
Enforcement.
For those who did not responded to Persuasion... or Coercion...  perhaps a little pro-active Enforcement might produce results.  Those with high points totals would eventually come under the control of Review Panels... who would take a detailed look at a driver's record and do everything in their power to ensure a driver did change and behave in an acceptable manner. 
I
I
Punishment.
This is not a totally separate system... a driver could be Fined, Banned or Imprisoned at any time for a serious offence... but these Punishments should be viewed as a sign of 'failure'... something to be imposed in special circumstances... or to fall back on when other efforts are proving to be unsuccessful... rather than the first and only strategy for raising driving standards.
I
Article.   Is tough enforcement the best way to improve traffic safety? A Drivers.com editorial asks whether tougher and tougher enforcement is the best way to reduce sloppy and reckless driving and improve safety?
I
I
Inevitability.
The greatest deterrent to bad behaviour is not the severity of the 'punishment', [after all, reckless driving can already carry a 'death sentence',] but the inevitability of being caught!  So, drivers should come to realise, that under this system, drive badly, they will be Reported... if they ignore the Warnings, they will end up at a Review Panel... don't co-operate, they will lose their licence... carry on driving, they will end up in Prison.  In many ways life will be made more difficult... but there would always be a viable alternative... just change their behaviour!! 
I
The following... looks at some ways that drivers might be influenced into driving in a particular way: [including the established punishment system] and how they might react in certain circumstances.
I
I
Road Supervisors.
I
[Motivation and Deterrent]  The road is a unique environment where every driver needs the active co-operation of all those around them... a safe driving environment absolutely depends on it.  Though there may be an agreed set of 'rules of engagement'... there is little that can be done if those around you choose to break them.  In fact... other drivers may inconvenience you... harass you... threaten you... put your life and property at risk... and still there is nothing you can legally do about it.
I
Most drivers do stick to the rules... most of the time and 'Interact' in an acceptable manner... others seem to leave a trail of harassed drivers in their wake... persistently breaking rules... intimidating, and verbally abusing anyone that gets in their way.  At present these drivers enjoy almost complete anonymity while out on the roads... all they have to worry about is the odd Police car... one glimpse and they instantly change the way they are driving. 
I
How would these drivers behave... if every tenth driver were a Road Supervisor? it should be a great deterrent... knowing they could be 'Reported' at any time for their anti-social behaviour.
I
On the positive side... those who volunteered to become Road Supervisors would be making a conscious personal commitment to improving their own driving... and being a good example to others... helping to make the roads a safer environment for everyone.
I
I
Senior Road Supervisors.
I
[Motivation and Deterrent]  Senior Road Supervisors would have additional powers and take a much more 'pro-active' approach.  They could have access to a special phone number to provide Police with 'Real-Time' Information.  At a minor accident, [which Police would not normally attend] a Senior Road Supervisor could ask Police to attend if there was a 'problem'.  This may be... a possible drunk driver... someone not giving the required Information... someone becoming abusive or violent: etc. etc.  They may also contact Police about vehicles being driven in an extremely dangerous or erratic way... which Police could intercept... if resources allowed.  Just knowing that this was a possibility should be enough for many to avoid the worst excesses of this type of behaviour.  
I
Again, on the positive side... those becoming 'Senior' Road Supervisors would be setting a good example to others... assisting those in difficulties... and making a very positive contribution to Road Safety.
I
I
Probationary Licence.  
I
[Motivation]  A minimum of 2 years on a 'Probationary' licence for young drivers... before graduating to a 'Full' licence... 1 year for demoted drivers.  No Insurance 'loading' for those progressing from a first time 'Learners' licence, [though their premiums tend to be high already... due to limited experience... and demographics.]
I
This system sets... important 'Targets' for drivers to aim for... it should motivate drivers to keep their points low... and discourage them from letting their points get to high.  They would need to have 15 points or less before 'earning' a Full licence...  At 25 points, their insurance premiums would rise... and their 'File' would be 'Reviewed'.  At 35 points, they would be asked to attend a Review Panel... and a whole range of restrictions would start to be imposed.  At 50 points, they would lose their licence... and have to retake their driving test, [but without serving any specific time ban... unless this was imposed by a Court.]  Drivers would always know the earliest date they could 'graduate' to a Full licence... gain one more point and instantly a new 'target date' is set.
I
There should also be... some initial restrictions in this period: i.e. no high performance cars or motorbikes... lower blood alcohol levels... lower limits on the number of passengers that can be carried.  [See Licences for details.]
I
All these 'Targets'... give a driver something very specific to aim for: [it is very much a carrot and stick approach] reduce the points and things will improve... allow the points to keep rising... and things will get steadily worse and worse!
I
I
'P' Plates.
I
[Motivation and Deterrent]  'P' Plates should be made compulsory... just as 'L' Learner plates are.  If the Police and Road Supervisors were particularly keeping an eye on inexperienced drivers, [and those 'high-risk' drivers demoted to 'P' plates] to make sure they were driving safely... they must be able to identify these drivers.  'P' plate drivers would more likely be reported or stopped for any displays of dangerous or aggressive driving.  All drivers like to think of themselves as 'Good' drivers... particularly young males... being demoted to a 'P' plate [including all the restrictions that go with it] by your fellow drivers sends out a very clear message... "you are not a good driver".  
I
There would need to be a concerted effort for at least a year to get rid of the 'P' Plate... and hopefully good habits would carry on once the 'Full' licence was obtained.  Any driver slipping back into bad habits... would see their points total start to rise again... and could quickly find themselves back where they started.  A powerful incentive for them to change their ways voluntarily before it became compulsory. 
I
It is quite certain that... a driver being demoted to a Probationary licence would not be happy driving around with 'P' plates stuck to their car.  While it may have little impact on their lives: [they can still get from A-B... they wouldn't lose their jobs] it would affect the way others viewed them... and that is something, hopefully, they would care about.
I
I
Points.
I
[Pressure] Road Supervisor points would only last for twelve months.  A 100 point system would allow for much greater flexibility than a system of just 12 points, [countries vary.]  It would be much less likely that 'Good' drivers would lose their licences because of 'a bit of bad luck'... and almost certain that serious and persistent offenders would find their points totals steadily rise.  Drivers could be quite sure, that if they made a display of reckless driving in front of a large crowd, their points total would rocket. 
I
The most effective deterrent... is the perception that you will inevitably get caught... rather than the severity of the sentence.  Behave for twelve months... the points total could be back to zero!
I
I
Reports. 
I
[Educational]  You may consider yourself a good driver... but what would your fellow road users think of your driving?  Firstly... a Report coming through your door, would be an opportunity for you to get some 'Feedback'.  You may not agree with a Report... but, if you received several, all reporting you for similar things, then maybe, it would be time to take stock, and make some changes.  Bearing in mind that all these Reports would come from experienced drivers... you may discover that you had picked up some bad habits that you were totally unaware of.  Drivers would not really be affected until they reached 25 points... so a few Reports would not be to much cause for concern.  Road Supervisors would lose their status once they reached 10 points... so they would have to take particular notice of any 'Feedback' they got... and make the necessary improvements... after all, if a Road Supervisor could not make alterations to their driving habits, then how could they expect others too. 
I
Reports would be sent out... to the registered address of the vehicle concerned, so anyone using a false address for whatever reason could expect to be found out quite quickly.  The vehicle could be identified on the Police computer... any patrol car requesting details would be informed about the possible false address... and the vehicle could be stopped and investigated.  Those using false addresses would probably not know that a Report had been sent out about them... and so be unaware that their details had been passed on to the Authorities. 
I
This System... is about being prepared to 'learn' from your fellow road users... not just 'teach' them!
I
I
Police:  Educational 'Inserts'.
I
[Educational]  Each time another 'distinctive' envelope dropped through the letter box, containing a Road Supervisor's Report, it could also be accompanied by any number of separate detailed 'Inserts' [Targeted Education] from the Police... covering every single offence and common scenario: [although in most cases it would probably just be dispatched automatically by a computer programme.]
I
So Firstly... 'Educational' Inserts prepared by the Experts... could be included about every offence mentioned on a Report: [six different Offences = six different Inserts] these could be in the form of a polite 'Tip' on how to improve their driving... or some definite 'Instructions' on changes that needed to be made.
I
Secondly... a whole range of 'Warning' Inserts could be drawn up.  Which 'Inserts' were sent would depend on the number of points already accumulated and the nature of the offences... the 'tone' would become more severe as the points total rose... culminating in dire 'Warnings' on the possible consequences of their actions.
I
A Report might not... always give sufficient 'Feedback'... but this extra piece of Information from the Police should point out exactly where a driver was going wrong.  It would also give additional authority to the Report... its inclusion would be noted on the driver's official record... and this means they would have less of an excuse if they ignored this guidance which then resulted in an accident. 
I
Once a driver... had a high enough total... a Report might be closely followed by a 'Demand' that they attend a Review Panel to discuss their problems.
I
I
Driver's File.
I
[Educational]  Although it might not be a 'Legal' requirement?? drivers would be strongly advised to keep all 'Reports' filed in a safe place... as this would become their official driving history.  There could be a space, somewhere on the Report, for a driver to write any comments, [for their records] in case they were asked about an incident at a later date.  Needing to write a comment about a Report, means they would really have to think about what had been reported.  It should be made clear... that although keeping their personal File in order might not be a 'Legal' requirement... it may be a costly mistake not to do so.  In the event that a driver had to appear before a Review Panel, or in Court, they would be asked to bring their File with them, [for them to refer to] the Review Panel or Court would also have a copy in front of them.  
I
They might be asked about various 'Reports' in the File, and to read any comments they wrote at the time: [of course they could have gone through the File subsequently and written comments... but this would still force them to re-examine their Reports.]  If a driver turned up with no File: [claiming... it's lost... stolen... the dog ate it!!] a Review Panel or Court may well conclude that this driver had not been taking their responsibilities seriously. 
I
For those with bad records... who did keep all their Reports... Educational Inserts... and written Warnings... it is possible that the sight of all that paperwork stuffed into a File... sent by many different people... all complaining about their driving... would eventually make them seriously think about the way they were going.
I
I
Active Files.
I
[Passive Pressure] a prelude to possible enforced action.  If a File was 'Active' it would mean that someone was reading every Report before it went to File.  At 50 points [25 points for Probationary drivers] a File would become 'Active' and be 'Reviewed'... perhaps no action would be taken... or the File might just remain 'Active'... or the driver might be asked to attend a Review Panel.  A File could be 'Activated' by a Court, [if due to appear] the Police, [because of a 'Serious Incident'] or when a driver had reached 75 points, [or 35 points for Probationary drivers,] the File would become 'Active'... and remain so until the points had been reduced sufficiently... and the driver 'discharged' from a Review Panel. 
I
This could also act as a deterrent... for some, just knowing that every new Report they received was also being read by someone else... and this could result in some imminent action being taken against them.
I
I
Family.
I
[Active Pressure]  Anyone who knew a person's licence number would be able to look it up on a Website and see exactly how many points that person had... or have had at any time in the past.  If there was a member of the family that was of particular concern: [i.e. children at college: or elderly parents] it would be possible to keep an eye on their points total... wherever they happened to be living.  It is not always possible to do anything about it... but it could give an early warning of potential problems... as would seeing large numbers of 'distinctive' looking envelopes coming through the post.
I
Article.   Learning to drive: a guide for parents A Drivers.com guide for parents of novice drivers. Covers several topics, including communicating in the car, how drivers learn best, safe driving tips, and attitude. [NEW - PDF version for easy printing.] 
I
Often those at most risk are young drivers... possibly living at home... and relying on their parents to provide the transport... this would provide important 'Feedback' to parents, who are in a 'Position of Influence'.  At present there is little way of knowing what happens once a young driver disappears down the end of the street... having recently completed their training... they are fully aware of what is expected of them... but, the way they drive when they have a parent sitting next to them... and the way they drive when they have their peers sitting next to them... may be two entirely different things.
I
In theory... it would also be possible to register an e-mail address or text number so that a Parent could be notified immediately a Report was made... [even if this was only a summary.]  When they returned Parents could ask them about the 'Incident'... they may have no idea what the Report was referring to... [in which case this may demonstrate a certain lack of self awareness.]  They may try to give an explanation about some other 'Incident'... [which would let them know that the 'Incident' was not a one-off.]  Or they might just be 'cagey'... not wanting to drop themselves in it!  Whatever... the message should get through that they cannot continue to act with impunity.
I
TWOC.  Stands for "Taken Without Consent".  One of the most common scenarios for TWOC are when Parents are away for some reason and one of their kids decides to take the family car for a spin.  They invariably think that they won't have an accident and no one will find out.  All too often they will get stopped by the Police or have an accident for which they are not insured... and a bit of fun turns into a nightmare.  This type of system should help discourage instances of TWOC.  The kids would know... even if they didn't have an accident... just one report and they would be found out.  If parents had their vehicle registered for text-messaging to their mobile phone about reports... they could be on the other side of the world... receive a text... then be on the phone to their children while they're still out having their bit of fun.
I
In North America... there are private companies that offer a service along these lines such as 'Tell-My-Mom.com' which is specifically aimed at the Parents of teenage drivers.  If the first indication that a problem exists is a Police Officer standing at the front door... then it may already be to late!!
I
I
Schools: Colleges: Universities.
I
[Active Pressure]  In many cases when young people start to drive they are attending some kind of further education facility.  Making Information available either to the 'Authorities' or to 'Student Bodies' may enable them to exert a positive influence during this period.  Young males particularly pride themselves on being 'good' drivers in the eyes of their peers... unfortunately their definition of a 'good' driver [drive fast and have great reactions!] can be very different from that outlined in the 'Highway Code'.  Close monitoring during this period would make sure students complied with any restrictions that had been imposed... and give a 'warning' about any potential problems.  It's not easy to claim the status of a 'good' driver if your fellow road users have clearly stated otherwise... and it's not easy to impress your friends if you've been banned from driving them anywhere.  
I
In order to counteract the usual peer pressure... to impress their friends by driving fast and taking risks... it's necessary to clearly establish an alternative measure of competence: i.e. 'Good' driving means... having the ability to 'Interact' with their fellow road users in a way which is consistently... 'Safe: Considerate: and Courteous'.
I
Article.   New curriculum to revolutionize driver training A Drivers.com editorial highlights some of the points made in a report from the U.S. AAA-FTS on driver education.  [More Articles.]
I
I
Employers.
I
[Active Pressure]  Employers could ask to see an employee's File... if their job involved any driving.  If a driver was using a company vehicle... the employer may be the first to see any 'Reports' that came through.  Either way employers would be expected to take any measures necessary to ensure their employees attained acceptable standards while out on their company's business.  At the same time... employers may need to review their own practices... because it may turn out that the root cause of the problem is one of their own making.  It's no good an employer telling its staff not to speed... but, at the same time handing out unrealistic delivery times, or targets.  
I
Insurance companies might be entitled to see the points totals of all employees within a company... to make a more accurate assessment of the risks... and set premiums accordingly.  Courts may also ask for similar Information to determine whether a company was primarily to blame for problems caused by its employees... or if they knew about an individual driver who had been driving dangerously... and what action they had taken to try and change the situation.  [For whatever reason, drivers of company vehicles do have a higher rate of accidents than those who are driving their own private cars.]
I

Re-training.   There are various schemes where employers can send their drivers for a re-assessment... or to rectify specific problems.  Click Here, to see an example of the kind of programmes which are available.  This kind of system would work better with a system like the Road Supervisors scheme because employers would have a better source of pre-course Information... and post-course Information to help monitor the level of improvement.

I
How would employees react... in this kind of situation? for instance, a driver who perpetually uses his truck to tailgate and intimidate others... being called in to see the boss, yet again, and having to explain why they keep driving so close to other vehicles... being asked to justify an indefensible practice.  The solution would be a simple one and remain in the hands of the driver... just back off! that is all they would need to do.  
I
Various schemes... whereby Trucks, or commercial vehicles might display a sticker saying... something like... 'How's my driving'... followed by a toll free number to ring with any complaints... have already been tried... and research has shown that accident rates can be reduced by about 20%.  Of course, this might seem a little unfair to those drivers participating... they can be reported by anyone... but everyone else just carries on as normal.  An official system would mean everyone was subject to the same rules and level of scrutiny.  [For an example see... 1800-How's-my-Driving?]
I
I
Potential Employers.
I
[Passive Pressure] means a company would not have to actually do anything... the pressure is caused by the situation.  When a person wants a particular job, [which involves driving] however well the initial interview might have gone... they still have little confidence in getting it due to the Reports in their driver's File... which they know the company will ask to see at some stage.  [USA... system now available: see... References - etc.]
I
The time might arrive... where anyone expecting to drive on behalf of a company would have to show a fairly good record over an extended period... this prospect alone might encourage some not to let their record become to bad.
I
I
Insurance Companies.
I
[Financial Pressure]  Insurance companies should be able to ask a driver for their File... this would give them more Information on which to assess any risk... and allow them to adjust their premiums accordingly.  A driver could always refuse to show it... but an Insurance company would be equally entitled to refuse any insurance cover.  If they knew a policy holder's driving licence number they could check to see how many points was on the licence at present... or at any time in the past.  If the points had always been low they might be quite happy to issue a policy without seeing the File.  An Insurance company could easily have the licence details of every insured driver and monitor their points on a continuous basis.  [UK. For those who already consider themselves to be low-risk drivers... especially if you have 4 years No Claims Bonus... try getting a quote online from Privilege Insurance.]
I
In the event of an accident... an Insurance company might want to review a driver's File to see if the accident was due to a pattern of bad driving... rather than a one off, genuine mistake.  If the accident was due to a bad habit they might ask the driver to undergo some driving instruction so the problem was not repeated.  The successful completion of a course might be made a condition of the Insurance company supplying cover in the future... or not increasing premiums.  One bad accident can cost a company millions... so a few hundred invested at this stage could prove to be a very worthwhile investment.
I
I
Review Panels.
I
[Enforcement and Education]  Drivers could be asked to attend a Review Panel at any time once past the 50 point mark, [or 25 points for a Probationary licence] or would definitely be asked to if they reached 75 points, [35 points for a Probationary licence.]  Drivers would have to give an account of their driving... explain why they had not responded positively to the Reports and Educational Inserts which they had been sent... outline their plans for reversing the problem... and demonstrate the 'Right' attitude: [that being... a willingness to change and improve their driving habits.]  They would also need to show that they were taking their responsibilities seriously by producing their own personal copy of their File... and show what comments they had written concerning each Report.  Drivers could find themselves... demoted to a lower class of licence: have restrictions placed on them: or ordered to complete a 'course' targeted at their particular problems.
I
In the case of another 'serious incident'... or a driver gaining another 5 points... they would be called back for a further review.  Having to explain themselves to a Review Panel: [which would have examined their File very carefully] attend courses: or being demoted: are not things any driver would look forward to, but once the process had begun, the only way out would be to make the necessary changes and improvements.
I
Only when the Review Panel... was satisfied that the necessary changes had been successfully completed would a File be 'De-activated'.  Failure to comply... would inevitably lead to the loss of their driving licence.
I
I
Police. 
I
[Enforcement] This, potentially, offers great benefits to the Police.  Any significant reduction in Accidents and Traffic offences means the Police could target their resources to other areas.  They would be receiving additional 'Real-Time' Information from Senior Road Supervisors out on the road... which means they could intercept many serious offenders that they would otherwise miss.  How would these 'offenders' react to this situation? knowing any driver or any pedestrian could be a Senior Road Supervisor... who had just reported their actions to the local Police... it would certainly make driving home drunk a lot more risky!
I
Additional Information.  They could also receive Information from all Road Supervisors... under the category of 'Accidents: Incidents: and Suspicious Vehicles'.  Reports 'On File' but not passed on to the registered owner... about activities that might be illegal, in some way.  This Information could help identify criminals... or possibly provide an important break when investigating a crime.
I
I
Financial Penalties.
I
[Punishment]  There are already some Financial Penalties for poor driving... if you have accidents your Insurance premiums will increase.  You can get... parking tickets: speeding fines: or end up in Court for any number of offences that could result in a financial penalty.  This does work to a certain extent... no one likes having to pay fines.  Often drivers believe they were just unlucky [and indeed they may have been] and are not that likely to be stopped again... in which case their behaviour would probably not change.
I

Priviledge Car Insurance.


I
This system would aim... to put a loading on Insurance premiums: [or we might say, provide additional Information to Insurance companies so that they can make a more accurate assessment... penalizing 'high-risk' drivers.]  Once a driver reached 25 points... a 25% loading might be added: [their fellow drivers would have deemed them to be a risk] each additional 5 points might attract a further 5%: [so 100 points would attract a 100% loading.]  Those being demoted to a Probationary licence would attract even higher premiums: [some kind of agreement between any Government and Insurance companies might be required... or perhaps they would just let market forces run their course?]
I
This would also be... a great incentive to improve ones driving... as Road Supervisors' points would only last for one year... it would be possible to get rid of a heavy 'loading' within that time frame.  [Though points originating from the Police or Courts could still last three years... or whatever? Countries may vary.]
I
I
Courts.
I
[Punishment]  Courts could operate in exactly the same way as they do at present... mainly concerning themselves with establishing guilt or innocence in connection with a particular offence... which would still attract 'Fines, Points, Driving bans and Imprisonment'.  A Court could refer an offender to their local Review Panel for 'further training' in addition to any other punishments they might hand out... a lost licence would not be automatically returned... it would have to be earned.  Courts would have a driver's File available, [which may contain little or no Information... but may also contain many reports covering an extended period of time] which Prosecutors and Defenders could make reference to.
I
No one likes having to appear in Court... the prospect would be that much more daunting knowing that the Court was in possession of dozens of Reports which had been submitted about dangerous driving, aggressive behaviour and the like.  The contents of a driver's File might then be taken into account when deciding on an appropriate punishment.
I
In addition... a 100 point system would offer far more flexibility than a 12 point system: [countries vary] and could easily be administered in the age of the computer.
I
I
Prison.
I
[Punishment]  If you can significantly reduce the number of deaths on the roads... then you will also reduce the number of drivers who are responsible for killing people... which in turn, should mean less people in prison.  There will always be some who... will commit crimes: are mentally unstable: get drunk: behave in a reckless and totally irresponsible way... and even try to outrun the Law.  No system can cure every problem... and for these individuals maybe a spell of imprisonment is inevitable.  Click Here to read a newspaper article which demonstrates exactly what we are talking about.
I
Ultimately... however justified a custodial sentence might be for an individual... large numbers of people being sent to Prison is not a 'Measure of Success'... it is a 'Measure of Failure'... just as a high number of Road Deaths is!
I
I
I
Back to the Top Home Site Plan Outline>>

Road Supervisors

Senior Road Supervisors  

New Points System

Licences.  

Files. 

Social Pressure

Review Panels

Offences.

Information: Data.