The Concept.
I Gatso Speed Camera.
Driving Offences.

[Outline.]

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Introduction.  
Dangerous Driving.
Inconsiderate Driving.
Discourteous Driving.
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Introduction.  
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A 'Road Supervisors' Handbook'... could be produced that included a very comprehensive list of 'Offences': [each 'Offence' could be given a 'code number' so that any forms would be quick and easy to fill out.  A programme would then fill in the details of the offences on the report and automatically sent 'educational' inserts for each offence mentioned.]  Each 'Offence' detailed should include a fairly comprehensive explanation as to what a Road Supervisor should be looking for... and the various factors that needed to be taken into consideration.
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A Road Supervisor would... quite possibly, be making just two reports per week, on average: [detailing the worst pieces of driving they had witnessed] so it is very unlikely that drivers would find their points total rising just because of minor breaches of the law.  The vast majority of drivers commit technical breaches of the law on a regular basis... there simply would not be enough points available to report everyone for everything: [nor is it the intention that there should be.]  If, on the other hand, a driver was... a 'Serious and/or Persistent' breaker of the law... then the outcome would be quite different.
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It is important... that drivers comply with all the rules of the road... but especially when they are travelling in close proximity to other vehicles.  Most of the rules about driving 'Safely'... and all those about being 'Considerate and Courteous'... are about how a driver should 'Interact' with their fellow road users... and it is this aspect of driving which should be the main focus of a 'Road Supervisor' type system.
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Dangerous Driving. 
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Dangerous driving and 'Near Misses'... can be the result of many things, including... loss of control: breaking rules: lack of concentration: substance abuse: bad attitudes: poor hazard perception: deteriorating health: poor judgement: not leaving a sufficient margin of error when interacting with other road users: etc. etc.  These are just broad categories which could come on their own or in any combination... the following covers a lot more specific examples.  But, however it occurs... a 'Near Miss' should be considered as an early warning sign... an indication of things to come? maybe!  More reports might confirm the identification of a 'high-risk' driver. 
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Article.   On the roads: war or peace? Is the standard of driving on our roads worse than it was a decade or two ago? Is highway culture breaking down into an uncivilized war zone of "me first" driving laced with aggression and hostility?  [More Articles]
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Reckless endangerment.  
[See 'Incident Report' at the bottom of the page.]  Basically, this would be examples of the worst kind of driving you may ever come across... where it is just pure luck that no one was killed or injured [in which case, see 'Accident Report'] 'Senior' Road Supervisors witnessing this type of driving... could call local Police with a view to having the vehicle 'Intercepted'.
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Driving without due care...
and attention.  This is a general term which can cover a multitude of sins.  Even the most experienced drivers can develop bad habits which are contrary to good driving technique or allow themselves to be distracted from the task at hand.  Some examples might be... taking both hands off the steering wheel: trying to read a map while still driving: eating: drinking: using a mobile phone: looking over their shoulder to talk to passengers in the rear seats: driving with one arm hanging out the door window: or even falling asleep ['nodding off'] at the wheel.
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Travelling in the wake of... 
an Emergency vehicle.  While most drivers will pull over and allow an emergency vehicle to pass, there are always a few who will just see this as an opportunity to make some progress.  Tailgating an emergency vehicle through heavy traffic is dangerous and selfish and drivers should be aware that this would be very high on the list of offences which would be targeted by Road Supervisors.
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Failing to give way to...
an Emergency vehicle.  It is not always possible to make way for an emergency vehicle to pass by, especially in heavy city traffic.  There are those who make no effort to get out of the way when the possibility is clearly there to do so and some will even drive along in front of the emergency vehicle, by-passing other vehicles that have pulled over, and ignore any obvious chances to get out of the way.
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Excessive speed.  
The speed limit marked on a road is the 'maximum' speed that is permitted, it may be, that a 'safe' speed is considerably slower than this, so drivers could find themselves being reported for 'excessive speed' even though they were not actually breaking any speed limits.  Drivers should always drive at a speed that is 'safe and appropriate to the condition that prevail on the road at the time'.  This means taking into account... their experience and capabilities as a driver: the type of vehicle which is being driven: road conditions: weather conditions: visibility: traffic density: pedestrians: cyclists: etc. etc. and making sure they can always stop on their own side of the road within the distance that they can see to be clear.  In heavy traffic they should try to use a similar speed to other vehicles in close proximity... once they start travelling significantly faster than those around them it should not come as any surprise if they found themselves being reported.
It can be said with a fair degree of certainty that there would be some circumstances where it would be very easy for a driver to find themselves being reported for using 'excessive speed'.  Most notably driving close to a school at start or finishing times: there may be lots of parked vehicles: lots of young children: [who can be unpredictable] and lots of parents: so drivers would need to be 'extra, extra' cautious.  Parents [Road Supervisors] would probably not show a lot of tolerance to a driver they felt was even slightly putting their children at risk and there is absolutely no reason why they should!  Speed Limit Sign.
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Exceeding the speed limit. 
While any driver could find themselves reported for breaking a speed limit, it should not be the primary concern of a Road Supervisor.  It is quite easy for a machine to pick out a vehicle that is exceeding a speed limit [by only a small amount,] but, what it cannot do is look at a complex situation and make an objective assessment as to whether a person was driving in a 'Safe' manner or not.  Road Supervisors could use their experience to make these sort of judgements and would, more likely, make their reports based on whether a driver was using a speed that was 'appropriate for the conditions' or not, rather than strict adherence to a speed limit.
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Tailgating.   
This can be very dangerous and many accidents [approx. 30%] are caused by drivers travelling to close to the vehicle in front.  As a guide:- in the highway code it is recommended that drivers leave a gap of two seconds between themselves and the vehicle in front, [double that in bad weather conditions.]  As with other offences, the worse it is, [closer and faster] the more likely it is that it would be reported.  It is particularly dangerous when a large vehicle does it to a car, if the car breaks hard the truck, [or whatever] behind will never stop in time.  Cars doing it to trucks, may not seem as bad as they have better brakes, but you cannot see past the truck so get absolutely no warning.  Even if you consider that you have 'excellent reactions', it's still a really bad habit, if you put yourself in a position where you need to brake hard in heavy traffic, then many vehicles behind may also need to brake hard, so even if you avoid an accident, your actions might cause one further back down the line.
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These recommendations... in the Highway Code do not take into account the reality of driving on a multi-lane highway in the modern day rush hour.  Travelling at 50mph [80kph] in bad weather means keeping a four second gap to the vehicle in front.  Travelling at about 24 yards per second that means having to keep 96 yards of clear road in front of you, [that's about the length of a football pitch.]  The reality is... open up a gap like that during the rush hour and four other vehicles will move into that space!
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Reasons for 'Tailgaters' and how to avoid them.  Click here to read this article which is hosted on the SafeSpeed website.

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Racing on a public highway.
One of the most dangerous things a driver can do is to become involved in a competition with another driver.  This could be someone they know or a complete stranger, but once they start they are usually quite easy to spot.  It may be just two cars who try to race each other away from a standing start at a set of traffic lights, in itself, maybe not that dangerous, but in the worst cases this can develop into a deadly game that involves pushing the drivers and their vehicles to the limits of their capabilities and beyond.  
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This can then involve a whole series of offences that may include... excessive speed: tailgating: dangerous overtaking: multiple and reactionary lane changing: etc. etc. and very often this sort of driving will involve the relatively young and inexperienced.  This type of driving should not only be reported by Road Supervisors but should also be targeted by Senior Road Supervisors who would be able to contact Police direct with a view to having them 'Intercepted' immediately.
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Reactionary lane changing.  
On multiple lane roads and particularly in heavy traffic, drivers need to make their intentions clear and give other drivers plenty of warning.  When changing lanes a driver should look in their mirrors, once clear, indicate for a couple of seconds and then move to the other lane also taking another couple of seconds.  Some drivers will complete the 'mirror: signal: manoeuvre' procedure in a single movement which may last less than one second: this is dangerous because it does not allow for any margin of error.  
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Multiple lane changing.  
This one can often be seen combined with the previous offence, changing lanes 'fast and often'.  It may be seen in various forms... there is the driver who will cross two: three: or four lanes: coming from a fast, outside lane to an exit ramp in a single movement: or perform a similar manoeuvre, coming from a slip road straight out to the fast lane in one move.  The 'multiple lane changer' can also be seen in slow, heavy traffic where each lane is moving independently.  Every time one lane starts to move a little quicker than another the 'multiple lane changer' will be desperately trying to join that lane: [only to find it suddenly slows up again.]  The only reason to do this is because this driver does not wish to sit in the traffic like everyone else... when not dangerous this can still be very annoying for others.
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Changing lanes without signalling. 
This can also be dangerous, particularly when combined with the previous two offences: those who are changing lanes 'fast: often: and without warning'.  When making out a report, it may by that half a dozen offences are listed, not just one.  By listing all the offences a more detailed picture can be given of the driving habits of a particular individual. 
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Weaving through traffic. 
This is something motorbike riders do, particularly in heavy city traffic.  Of course, there is no reason why riders should be expected to sit in traffic with everyone else when they can make progress without impeding others.  It is not the fact that they do it that matters, only the manner in which it is done... some do this in a quite reckless fashion: [generally the young and inexperienced] travelling at speed through the smallest gaps and leaving almost no margin of error.  One mistake by anyone and it is, inevitably, the motorbike rider who will come off worst.
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Erratic driving.  
This is something you would expect to see from someone who is driving under the influence of 'Drink or Drugs'.  Speed that varies for no apparent reason, wandering across lanes, clipping kerbs, reacting slowly to things like traffic lights.  Of course you can not positively say that a driver is 'under the influence' without performing tests but a report for 'Erratic driving' should start the alarm bells ringing!  If this was a driver with a previous conviction for 'Drink Driving' then they should expect some special attention.
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This is something Senior Road Supervisors should particularly be on the lookout for, one call to the local Police centre, the computer should instantly alert Police to the fact that the owner had, for instance, a previous conviction, or had been reported previously for 'Erratic driving' and priority given to making an 'Interception' in such cases.  Taking quiet back streets to get home should cease to be an option when they know there is a chance the Police could be waiting for them anywhere on route, up to and including their own front drive.
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Failing to give way.  
This would cover any instant where a driver does not give way to a vehicle which had priority [this is another major contributor of accidents] and subsequently caused that vehicle to 'Stop: Change Speed: or Direction' so as to avoid a collision.
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Failing to merge correctly. 
Merging properly is something that requires a fair amount of co-operation and consideration.  When done well vehicles coming down a slip road will find the inside lane free because others have moved out to allow for easy access.  In heavy traffic where this is difficult, it should still be possible to join traffic doing a similar speed and effortlessly move into the gaps that have been deliberately left.  When done badly this can leave a driver travelling at speed, surrounded by vehicles and nowhere to go, relying on someone else's good driving to get them out of a potentially disastrous situation. 
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There can also be problems... at very low speeds where for some reason two lanes are becoming one lane: most drivers will merge without incident, usually allowing alternate vehicles the chance to join the single lane.  Then suddenly there will be a driver who will push for all they are worth to get just one vehicle ahead, they simply will not yield, they are more than ready for a confrontation!  It would be far better just to let this driver go, this is not someone you would want stuck right behind you.
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Deliberate gap closing.  
For whatever reason, some drivers will be prepared to risk life and limb in order to prevent another driver from moving from one lane, into the gap immediately in front of them.  Quite clearly, good driving would mean deliberately backing off, making a larger space for the other driver to move into, making the lane change safer and life in general a little easier for a fellow road user.  However unnecessary a particular manoeuvre may appear it is always better to co-operate than to try and physically prevent such a move.
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Cutting in front of another vehicle. 
This can occur when a driver overtakes and finds themselves running out of time or space, they need to get back into the line of traffic and cause another vehicle to break in order to achieve this.  It can happen in busy city traffic when a driver quickly changes lanes, moving into a space that doesn't really exist, and it can happen as a shear act of aggression where the driver knows exactly what they are doing.
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It can be especially dangerous... for a car, if it cuts in front of a large truck: [effectively, 'invading its territory'] and then finds it suddenly needs to start braking.  The truck behind needs a lot more stopping distance than the car which is suddenly in front of it.  Being reported for this might help the car driver to realise what a dangerous position they were putting themselves in: [a detailed educational Insert from the Police could explain all the dangers associated with large trucks] and ensure they avoided this kind of situation in the future.
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Jumping a red light.  
This is something that requires no clarification at all, it is easy to spot and happens all to frequently.  Drivers may get away with it time and again, but when this goes wrong it can be disastrous!
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A driver cannot assume... that they have a few seconds leeway before vehicles start coming into the junction from a different direction, the vehicle they could collide with, might already be sitting in the middle of the junction waiting for a chance to turn across the oncoming traffic.  When events unfold at just the wrong time, the lights turn to amber, the vehicle waiting to turn, makes an assumption that the oncoming vehicle will stop for the red light and starts to make their turn.  At that very moment the driver in the oncoming vehicle decides they can beat the red light and accelerates.  The turning vehicle may then catch the full impact of the oncoming vehicle into their side with potentially deadly results for anyone in the near side passenger seats.
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Making an illegal right hand turn.
Making a turn where a sign is specifically telling drivers not to, for some reason, [there may be many different reasons why such a sign has been erected.]
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Making an illegal left hand turn.
Same as above, but depending on which side of the road you drive on, one of these can often mean turning across the path of oncoming traffic and/or slowing down in a fast, outside lane, which potentially is much more dangerous.
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Making an illegal U-turn. 
Could be in contravention of a no U-turn sign, or simply making a U-turn anywhere, in such a way as to create a potential danger for others.
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Cutting across a junction.  
A fairly common habit where drivers will turn into a junction or a side street and cut right across the corner, so initially they are on the wrong side of the road, and could collide with another approaching vehicle, especially if it is a junction with restricted views. 
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Going through a No-entry sign.
May happen by accident rather than being done intentionally, but it would still mean that the driver was causing a danger by not paying sufficient attention to the road signs.  The 'No-entry' may just apply to some kinds of vehicles, like private cars, while still allowing entry to others, like... Buses: Taxis: or Delivery vehicles.
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Travelling the wrong way... 
up a one way street.  It could be that a driver makes a really bad mistake and ends up driving the wrong way down a one way street, [it would be incredibly reckless to be doing it on purpose] or more likely, a driver may reverse a long way back up a one way street: [the vehicle may be facing in the right direction but still  travelling in the wrong direction] this can be very dangerous for pedestrians, who may walk out into the road while only looking for vehicles coming from the proper direction.
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Wandering out of a lane. 
This may be just a case of poor lane discipline, which in heavy city traffic can easily result in minor damage to another vehicle and could be serious if it occurs at higher speeds.  On long multi-lane roads this might indicate that a driver is starting to 'nod off' and really needs to pull over and rest for a while.  It can also be one of the tell tale signs of someone who is driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. 
In some countries... where drivers cover very long distances between towns: [and particularly when there is little other traffic] like Australia: Canada: and some parts of U.S.A. people falling asleep at the wheel and running off the road is a major problem.  They do already have campaigns to try and get drivers to stop and take regular breaks... as these long monotonous roads have an almost hypnotic affect... and drivers can fall asleep very easily... simply due to a lack of sensory stimulation.  This is one kind of situation that this system would probably have very little effect on... it would need to be treated as a totally separate issue.  Long Straight Empty Road.
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Driving to slowly...
compared to other traffic.  This should not include any vehicle [or drivers] who might reasonably be expected to travel slower than others, like learner drivers or large heavy vehicles.  But rather, a vehicle which is travelling noticeably slower than other vehicles around it and creating an obstruction or tailback for no apparent reason.  This can be a warning sign, particularly concerning elderly drivers who's driving skills may be gradually deteriorating.  Although this might be a sensitive issue, it could provide some very important feedback about a developing problem.
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Overtaking in a dangerous manner.
This is a general term that could cover anything not listed below but should be the major consideration when making any report for overtaking, 'was it dangerous'?  For all the following categories, we could say, if it was done in a perfectly safe manner then it is not something to worry about.  Overtaking is a common and perfectly legitimate manoeuvre, but the need for safety cannot be over emphasized, if it goes badly wrong, you could find two vehicles hitting each other head on at high speed, the result is likely to be disastrous. 
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Overtaking unnecessarily.  
Because overtaking has such a potential for danger it should be avoided if it really is not necessary.  In this instance, we mean the impatient driver who just cannot wait to get passed and having just overtaken, almost immediately slows down to turn off!
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Overtaking in contravention...
of a 'General Directive'.  If indeed a 'General Directive' was ever issued in relation to overtaking in certain circumstances, as an example... when drivers find themselves on a single lane road in heavy bumper to bumper traffic, at any time, [but particularly on the public holiday 'long weekends'] then they should refrain from overtaking unless there is clear open road up ahead.  [Everyone is in a hurry and wants to get to their destination as soon and as safely as possible.]  Drivers should try to maintain their speed and just 'go with the flow'.  This is what most drivers already do, but there is always a few who will try to overtake at every opportunity, squeeze into spaces that don't really exist, cause danger and annoyance to everyone around them, and all to save themselves a few minutes on their journey.  This sort of directive is particularly aimed at these drivers, misbehave in these circumstances and a driver should expect their points total to rocket!
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Overtaking on the 'Hard shoulder'.
The 'Hard shoulder' is the inside lane of multi-lane roads that are only used by vehicles that have broken down, or the emergency services when absolutely necessary.  Very occasionally a vehicle may be seen overtaking, at speed, using this lane, something that is extremely dangerous.  More likely this will be seen in very heavy traffic that has come to a virtual standstill, where someone will drive relatively slowly along the Hard shoulder, by-passing literally hundreds of other vehicles.
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Overtaking on a solid white line. 
A solid white line means no overtaking because of some sort of a hazard.  This could be because you cannot clearly see the road ahead: i.e. a bend: brow of a hill: or because of some other potential danger, like... a junction: narrow bridge: or pedestrians.  The exact reason may not always be obvious, but they are there for a purpose and need to be obeyed.
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Overtaking on a bend.  
Just a little more specific that the rule above, but could well mean that the driver had also crossed solid white lines, in which case both rules should be mentioned.  On wide roads with long sweeping bends this may not be a problem, sometimes it is easier to see past a large vehicle on a road with a curve than it is on a straight road.  In all cases, it would be a matter of judging the individual circumstances based on your own personal experience as a driver.
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Overtaking on the brow of a hill.
Again, a more specific rule, so would have its own code number, for reporting purposes, can be very dangerous if the view ahead is restricted.
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Overtaking on the inside.  
Also known as 'Undertaking', and can be very dangerous as someone may pull into an inside lane unaware that this illegal manoeuvre was being made.  A contributing factor to this may be that someone is travelling slowly in an outside lane, refusing to move over and holding everyone up, which is also very bad driving, so if a report were being contemplated maybe the second car which was the initial cause of the problem should be the recipient of it?  In many cases a judgement might have to be made about two vehicles in conflict: who was the main culprit?
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Overtaking a truck...
on the inside as it attempts to turn.  This is a real 'suicide' move... any driver doing this would probably do so because they did not realise that a large truck was pulling out wide in order to make a turn.  The truck moves out, they shoot up the inside lane and suddenly the truck turns straight across their path... it's a scary situation and one that most drivers would be happy not to repeat.   Large logging truck.
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The main point of reporting this... would be to supply 'feedback' to the driver: [who may very well be cursing the driver of the truck] your Report... plus an educational 'Insert' from the Police... would explain all the dangers associated with... turning trucks: or of 'lurking' in their blind spots: and let them know that the reported incident was entirely their own fault. 
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Overtaking a vehicle stopped...
at a pedestrian crossing.  Potentially very dangerous, if a driver had stopped then there would be a good chance that someone was about to try and cross.  Any pedestrian could well be obscured by the vehicle that had stopped so could easily step out straight in front of the overtaking vehicle.
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Passing to close to a cyclist.  
Something many cyclists have to put up with on a regular basis.  They are slow compared to other vehicles when out on the open road and drivers will often become impatient and try to squeeze past when there really isn't the time and/or space.  Cyclists are very vulnerable and any misjudgement by a driver can have very serious consequences for the rider.
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Of course... cyclists are not always blameless, especially around towns and cities, where they will weave in and out of traffic and can be very difficult to spot.  Some riders seem to think that none of the rules of the road apply to them.
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Failing to give way to pedestrians.  
Just like cyclists, pedestrians are very vulnerable so extra care needs to be taken whenever they are about, especially near to schools as children tend to be unpredictable and could run out into the road without warning.  At some crossings vehicles have to give way to pedestrians with very little warning so the best solution is just to keep your speed well down.  
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It's not always easy... to see everything that's happening on the roads... particularly in a busy urban environment... in poor light conditions and when a person is wearing dark clothes.  So, pedestrians can also do themselves a favour when using crossings... they should just take an extra second and make sure that all drivers have seen them and they are definitely going to stop before they start to cross.  [See... Human Error in Road Accidents.]
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Driver or passengers not...
wearing seatbelts.  Compulsory wearing of seatbelts is not always popular, but it does save lives and should be enforced, it's simple to do and it costs nothing.  Some drivers may take the view that it is their life so they should be able to do as they like, but when they are seriously injured it is the 'State' [i.e. everyone else] that has to look after them and pick up the bill. 
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Some will say... they know of instances where a person only survived an accident because they were not wearing a seatbelt... and maybe there are some examples like this... but that's like saying that you heard about someone who was walking down a pavement and got run over by a bus... and drawing the conclusion... that it is just as safe to walk in the road!!
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Unrestrained children in vehicle.
This does not mean just sitting in a seat without a seat belt on.  Despite years of publicity about the dangers of unrestrained children in vehicles, occasionally you will still see children actually standing up on the seats, laying across the parcel shelf in the rear window of playing in the luggage area of a station wagon, [estate car.]
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Unrestrained animal...
in or on a vehicle. Again, not just laying on the back seat of a car.  Rather those that are running around and out of control, who may become a distraction for the driver, occasionally you might even see a person driving with a dog sitting on their lap.
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Another common scenario... is the dog who runs around the back of an open pick-up, barking at everything that moves.  Though they do seem to have amazing balance, a large number of dogs are killed or injured each year when they fall off one of these vehicles while it is travelling at speed.
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More than one passenger...
on a motorbike.  Or if a Learner, any passenger on the motorbike.  In some countries it is quite common to see three people or more on a single motorbike, but in the Industrialized world, two is usually the limit, but sometimes you may see riders who exceed this limit.
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Motorcyclist: not wearing...
crash helmet.  As with seat belts, this is not popular with all riders who believe it is infringing their right to choose.  It does undoubtedly save lives and we believe this law should be enforced.  Again, it is the 'State' [i.e. tax payers] who have to look after the seriously injured and pick up the bill and for a person with serious head injuries who needs a lifetime of care this can literally run into the 'millions', whatever currency you care to choose. 
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Using a hand held mobile phone...
while driving.  May not be illegal in every country.  Some recent studies have shown that using a mobile phone while driving can be more dangerous than being over the drink/drive limit.  As with many other rules, the circumstances in which it is done will determine just how unsafe this is, if a vehicle is in heavy city traffic travelling at walking pace, it is unlikely to be a problem, if it's done at high speed or when a vehicle is being manoeuvred it could prove to be fatal.
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Driving with an unsafe load.  
Can cause a danger, but particularly when it is a heavy load falling off the back of a large truck.  It may be that a load is unsafe simply because it severely restricts the view of the driver.
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Driving without headlights...
in poor visibility.  Sometimes you may see a vehicle in the city at night without its lights on, simply because the driver has forgotten, [one quick flash of the headlights may bring this fact to their attention.]  Others seem like they are trying not to wear their lights out!  It may be getting dark, heavy rain, fog, everyone else has their lights on, but there's usually a few that just have to leave it till the last possible moment.  Lights are not just to help you see, they make sure that you can be seen by everyone else. 
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Dazzling oncoming vehicles...
with headlights.  Those that drive around and do not dip their headlights for on-coming vehicles, or a vehicle close in front of them.  This could be a technical problem but if they receive a report through the post about it, they will at least know it is a problem for others.  May be difficult to report as the vehicle could well be travelling in the opposite direction and in the dark.
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Not having properly...
cleared windows.  The dangerous times are particularly in winter where drivers may start their journeys with windows covered in thick snow or ice, relying on the heater and wipers to eventually clear things.
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Another time can be when it is raining heavy in humid conditions and you have a lot of passengers in the car.  Keeping all the windows free from mist can be very difficult, but driving around busy streets when you can't see properly is virtually impossible!
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Not obeying hand signals... 
of an official.  This would include such things as, not stopping when told to by a school crossing patrol, or those directing traffic where the road is being dug up or repaired.
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Stopping beyond a stop line.  
Can be dangerous, especially when coming out of a concealed junction on to a narrow road.  If there is traffic coming from both directions the moment a vehicle arrives at a junction and pulls out to far, there may be nowhere for them to go to avoid a collision.
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Driving along a footpath.  
Sometimes drivers will mount a footpath in order to get past a turning vehicle, whether it's dangerous would depend on how far they pull over on to the footpath, how far they travel along the footpath, how fast they are travelling and whether there are any pedestrians around.  In cities it is quite common to see motorbike couriers riding along footpaths in close proximity to pedestrians.
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Other.  
There would invariably be things happening out on the road that doesn't seem to fall into any particular category but is clearly dangerous, so each section should have an offence marked 'Other' or something similar.
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